Iceland in contrast

Iceland

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Into the North – Live well, eat well – the Icelandic way


This book is both a personal cookbook and a culinary saga of Iceland, told through recipes that give the reader a glimpse into the daily hardships and unique history that have shaped the cuisine of the country over the last 1.100 years. Some of the recipes in this book have roots in traditions that go back many centuries while others are more recent additions to the family recipe collection, inspired by locally and seasonally available ingredients in Iceland.
The book is richly illustrated, not only with photographs demonstrating food-preparation and cooking techniques but with a spectacular gallery of nature and landscape photographs.
The reader is invited to take a tour through the changing seasons, roam the green meadows of the countryside, escape into the naked wilderness, climb glaciers and volcanoes, and sail the rough seas that surround Iceland. The authors, Inga Elsa Bergthorsdottir and Gisli Egill Hrafnsson, share their love, passion and experience of food and nature with the reader through recipes, food history and family lore.
Finalist for the Best Translated Book Gourmand Award 2012

Shop online at  Arcticselection.com

 

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Skaftafell National Park – Panorama

Skaftafell National Park – Panorama, South Iceland ( photo by skarpi )

More information on Skaftafell

 

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Cintamani store

Cintamani store, Laugavegur, main shopping street in Reykjavík

Hugarheimur Árna

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Mælifellssandur

The fine sands of Mælifellssandur,to the north of Mýrdalsjökull, are constantly reshaped by the wind.

 

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Why So Many Icelanders Still Believe in Invisible Elves

Why So Many Icelanders Still Believe in Invisible Elves

How the country’s history and geography created the perfect setting for magical creatures, whose perceived existence sparks environmental protests to this day.

theatlantic.com

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Ten of the world’s most mind-blowing landscapes

Waterfall at Mýrdalsjökull glacier, Iceland

Iceland has a remarkable array of impressive waterfalls, from curvaceous Goðafoss to thundering Dettifoss. The falls at Mýrdalsjökull are especially impressive: the glacier covers an active volcano, and the run-off creates a seriously powerful cascade.

Read more: lonelyplanet.com
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Ten of the world’s most mind-blowing landscapes

At the seam between two tectonic plates, Iceland is one of the world’s most geologically active regions, a huge draw for travellers with a thirst for adventure. In such an unpredictable landscape, the Strokkur geyser manages to remain surprisingly punctual: it erupts every four to eight minutes, blasting water up to 40m into the air. The word ‘geyser’ itself comes from the Icelandic, ‘geysa’, which means ‘to gush’.

See them all: lonelyplanet.com

 

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Futhark, Icelandic runes

When Iceland was settled, the written alphabet of the Norse people consisted of runes. The word rune originally meant a secret or covert symbol used for magical purposes. Runes were scratched or chiseled into hard material like wood, horn or stone and were characterized by straight lines and angles. The runic alphabet that was used in ancient times is called Futhark based on the first six characters of the alphabet. Almost one hundred rune inscriptions have been discovered in Iceland and the oldest one, found in Viðey  (an island just off Reykjavík), is probably from the tenth or eleventh century. It has been hypothesized that inscriptions involving the entire runic alphabet, as seen in the wall sticker, where used as a talisman or had simply been carved for teaching purposes.

More extensive text is included with the product

Shop at arctiselection.com

 

Fúþark

 

Þegar Ísland byggðist voru rúnir ritmál norrænna þjóða. Orðið rún þýddi upphaflega leyndarmál eða leynilegt tákn, notað til galdra. Rúnir voru ristar eða höggnar í hart efni eins og tré, horn eða stein og einkenndust af beinum línum og hvössum hornum. Rúnastafrófið sem var notað til forna kallast fúþark eftir fyrstu sex stöfum stafrófsins. Tæplega hundrað rúnaristur hafa fundist á Íslandi og sú elsta, sem fannst í Viðey, er líklegast frá tíundu eða elleftu öld. Áletranir þar sem fúþarkið stendur sjálfstætt, eins og í vegglímmiðanum, hafa fundist víða á Norðurlöndunum og talið er að slíkar áletranir hafi verið ritaðar til lærdóms eða jafnvel notaðar sem verndargripir.

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